Archive for Lecture

Last Sunday Series: Whitebark Pine – Sentinel of Alpine Forests

The Methow valley Interpretive Center presents the next in their series of Last Sunday lectures, Whitebark Pine – Sentinel of Alpine Forests with presenter Connie Mehmel.

Connie is a forester and forest insect specialist who has spent many seasons walking the alpine trails of eastern Washington looking at whitebark pines. She currently works for the US Forest Service, stationed out of the Wenatchee Forestry Sciences Lab. She is a member of the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation, the Society of American Foresters and the Washington Native Plant Society.

Last Sunday presentations are open to the public and presented free of charge, but donations are graciously accepted at the door.

The lecture is presented in Building #2 on the TwispWorks Campus.

Dana Visalli presents “What I have learned about US Foreign Policy”

Dana Visalli has traveled to Iraq four times since 2003, to Afghanistan four times since 2010, and to Guantanamo in Cuba, to Vietnam, and to the Syrian border in recent years. Dana believes there are many factual lessons to be learned about US foreign policy through such travel. For example, did you know that, at least arguably, the conflict with Korea actually started in 1866, when the US sent the warship the General Sherman up the Taedong River, after permission had been denied by the Koreans? The US wanted to force Korea to open its ports to trade. In response Korea sank the ship, and the US returned for revenge. There are also psychological lessons; it becomes clear that all cultures (and individuals) interpret events in their own favor. An end to war may only be a broader (and more honest) perspective on reality. There is a lot of emotionally challenging material in this program, but Dana will end on the genuine potential of the human family to live in relative peace.

This lecture is free, but donations toward room rental are appreciated.

The lecture will be held in the Education Station, Building #9.

STORIES OF THE METHOW LECTURE: Myth & Mystery in the Night Sky

The Methow Valley Interpretive Center along with Washington State Parks present a Stories of the Methow Lecture: Myth & Mystery in the Night Sky with David Ward.

David Ward started looking at the stars when he was 5 years old. He built his own telescope as a teenager. Currently he writes a monthly column on stargazing for the Methow Valley News. For many years he has presented stargazing programs throughout the west, from the North Cascades to Death Valley, California. David loves to combine ancient people’s stories about the stars along with our modern understanding of the amazing cosmos.

The lecture will be held at the Pearrygin Lake State Park Amphitheater – a Discover Pass is required and can be obtained at the Park entrance.

STORIES OF THE METHOW LECTURE: Wild Seed Collecting

The Methow Valley Interpretive Center along with Washington State Parks present a Stories of the Methow Lecture on Wild Seed Collecting led by Rob Crandall. Rob is a knowledgeable and enthusiastic educator and owner of “Methow Natives”; a plant nursery focusing on container grown plants native to the Methow Valley. Rob has been active in the salmon recovery efforts in the Valley for the past 12 years and has participated in habitat restoration projects for government agencies and private owners.
The lecture will be held at the Pearrygin Lake State Park Amphitheater – a Discover Pass is required and can be obtained at the Park entrance.

STORIES OF THE METHOW LECTURE: From Valley to Summit-Discovering the Plant World in the Methow

The Methow Valley Interpretive Center along with Washington State Parks present a Stories of the Methow Lecture:From Valley to Summit-Discovering the Plant World in the Methow with George Wooten.

George Wooten is a Microbiologist who studied Pharmacognosy and Medicinal Chemistry at University of Maryland Graduate School of Pharmacy. George helped write the North Cascades Grizzly Bear Ecosystem study for the Okanogan National Forest, and installed the first Geographic Information System at their Winthrop Office. He currently works with Conservation Northwest, teaches botany at Wenatchee Valley College in Omak, and does rare plant surveys on State Parks with Pacific Biodiversity Institute in Winthrop.

The lecture will be held at the Pearrygin Lake State Park Amphitheater – a Discover Pass is required and can be obtained at the Park entrance.